Judge Denies Injunction Request to Allow Participation of LGBT Group in Tet Parade

pride-flags-sunsetYesterday afternoon, Orange County Superior Court Judge Geoffrey T. Glass ruled against the Viet LGBT Coalition’ s request for an injunction to compel the organizers of the 2013 Tet Parade, the Vietnamese American Federation of Southern California, to allow their participation as a group in this year’s parade. From the outset, I didn’t see much hope in their request being granted. But one thing the suit did was demonstrate the bigotry of the plaintiff’s, and in particular their attorneys, through their outrageous and disgusting arguments. It is one thing to argue a case on the issue of law, it’s another to try to sway a judge with photos of scantily clad men participating in unrelated LGBT Pride parades.

Laura Kanter, Youth Program Director at the Gay and Lesbian Community Services Center of Orange County wrote on her Facebook wall:

Today, in court, it seemed to me that the judge was not pleased to have to rule on the matter. The parade organizers have been incredibly strategic from the beginning. Their lawyer submitted photos of men wearing g-strings from some unknown gay pride parade as evidence as to why the judge should rule in their favor. The judge made a point to say that he was offended, not by the photos, but by the presumption on the part of the parade organizers and their attorney, that he would be. He gave them a hard time before he ruled that by law, he could not issue an injunction in this matter.

dinanguyenolder2.jpg

Dina Nguyen

If the actions of the attorneys for the Vietnamese American Federation of Southern California weren’t bad enough, who these attorneys are is even worse. Dina Nguyen, is a current member of the Garden Grove City Council, and her colleague on the case, Mark Rosen, is a former Garden Grove City Council Member, and current appointee to the Orange County Vector Control Board Mark Rosen. Dina Nguyen’s participation doesn’t surprise me. She took a similar stance when Vietnamese groups argued against participation of the LGBT contingent in 2010. Mr. Rosen is a surprise. I have known Mark Rosen for more than 12 years and I never had any indication he held anti-LGBT beliefs. Maybe business is slow for him and the money was too good to pass up. But when you lay down with the homophobic dogs, you tend to pick up their fleas.

Mark Rosen

Mark Rosen

Because of their participation in this case, and their antics in court, Rosen and Nguyen have officially demonstrated their unfitness for the jobs of public trust that they hold. Their actions demonstrate that they endorse discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. They endorse such discrimination by falsely portraying the Viet LGBT Coalition in the most derogatory way possible to describe the consequences of allowing LGBT participation in an manner that is the exact opposite of the history of the past 3 years.

LBGT Tet Parade Contingent

LBGT Tet Parade Contingent

While it is expected that some members of the LGBT coalition will attempt to participate with other groups, the active participation of these two high profile elected and appointed city officials draws a line that any self respecting elected or appointed official, who claims to support LGBT equality, cannot cross. Any elected or appointed individual who participates in the 2013 Tet parade in Westminster will be forever branded as a supporter of anti-LGBT bigotry and hate.

Ladies and gentlemen, there is no wiggle room here. If, as an elected or appointed official or community leader, you join in this parade, you support the bigotry of a few zealots who would rather stone members of the LGBT community than allow them to participate openly in their own communities.

Here is the Orange County Register story on yesterday’s court proceedings.

  8 comments for “Judge Denies Injunction Request to Allow Participation of LGBT Group in Tet Parade

  1. jose s.
    February 8, 2013 at 10:07 am

    Lets not forget in 2008 it was dina nguyen along with that fence crashing drunk andy quach who went to irvine valley college and threatened to bring busloads of communists to protest if they didnt take down a flag. And its been well known dina herself has always had a thing for married men making her a common slut. For those reasons she should never hold public office let alone speak against any people who are obviously more american and more moral than herself.

  2. February 8, 2013 at 10:18 pm

    Whoa, Chris! Chill out on that last paragraph! I’ve been working closely with the LGBT Viets, and they prefer people – including politicians – to come, and march with them!

    I’ve already convinced a few good liberal politicians to do just that. And Diana Lee Carey is gonna march in her Viet garb with a black arm band, and a couple of gays accompanying her. Statements like that are MUCH more effective than just not being there.

    See what you think, pal…
    http://www.orangejuiceblog.com/2013/02/will-god-rain-on-this-years-anti-gay-tet-parade/

    Gay supporters, meet 8:30 Sunday morning at the Asian Garden Mall! Just make sure you make it clear why you’re there!

    • February 9, 2013 at 10:52 am

      Vern, While I understand the imagery of an elected official riding in a parade with an arm band or small LGBT Pride flag, I am not sure it sends the right message to the organizers. They gain legitimacy with the participation of elected officials. While I would prefer they add strong PUBLIC condemnation of the organizers to their absence, the fact of their absence sends the message the organizers need to hear. “That they do not, and will not, condone their behavior and that it is so abhorrent that they will have nothing to do with this important community and cultural event.”

      Elected officials who attend and show some form of solidarity by wearing a small symbol of support will not get a pass from me. Now if they participate by adding members of the Viet LGBT coalition to their entry, or adding a large sign, in English or Vietnamese, expressing support and condemning discrimination, that might equal a withdrawal.

      This issue is now far larger than the participation of the LGBT contingent in the Parade. It is now a matter of principle. There is a solid line when it comes to support for equality and opposition to discrimination and bigotry. Public officials can only ride on one side or the other. Straddling the line, or looking for areas of grey, is simply unacceptable.

      Also,

      To participate at this point, after the bold actions of the GGUSD under Bao Nguyen’s leadership, would negate the statement made on Tuesday night by the board.

      • February 9, 2013 at 11:02 am

        You and I have been discussing this over at my place, and I think we’re pretty much on the same page.

        “Now if they participate by adding members of the Viet LGBT coalition to their entry, or adding a large sign, in English or Vietnamese, expressing support and condemning discrimination, that might equal a withdrawal.”

        That pretty much describes what Diana Carey, Sal Tinajero, and others are proposing to do, and IT IS WHAT THE LGBT VIETS WANT.

        “Straddling the line, or looking for areas of grey, is simply unacceptable.”

        Amen there.

        Any elected official in doubt of the best course of action here should contact the Viet LGBT spokesperson Hiu Nguyen, at 714-495-8862.

        And speaking of Bao, I won’t be surprised if he shows up himself in solidarity with the LGBT. All I know is he Facebook-”liked” our invitation. I’ll see if I can get hold of him.

        • February 9, 2013 at 11:15 am

          It should be interesting to see what the Tet parade organizers actually allow. Since they have made it clear that the participation of the LGBT community is unacceptable in the Vietnamese culture, and fought with sickening vigor to uphold that position in court, I cannot see them simple allowing their participation under another banner.

          I’ll be there, camera in hand, to document for a “Wall of Shame” those who participate without demonstrating visible opposition to the organizer’s discriminatory acts. For the record, an armband alone WILL NOT CUT IT! A LGBT Pride flag, WILL NOT CUT IT! Visible written condemnation of the organizers is the MINIMUM of a litmus test from my perspective.

          • February 9, 2013 at 11:35 am

            Sounds good, and thanks for covering it. Wish I could be there.

  3. Jeff LeTourneau
    February 9, 2013 at 2:35 pm

    Allow me to applaud your assessment of the recent call for Bob and Quan to “behave” if they wish to participate in the parade. I have been troubled for several days by this issue as it appears in other forms as well. For example, it took a great deal of political courage for Loretta Sanchez, Alan Lowenthal, Lou Correa, David Benevides and Roman Renya (sp?) and others to pull out of the parade. To have the organizing committee then publicly say this is not a boycott or protest, does disservice to those who have sacrificed for this battle for justice. Additionally to organize for and win a battle at the GG School Dist which was absolutely about “BOYCOTTING” the parade while at the same time issuing the no boycott statement is again contradictory and problematic.

    In the end, we have to address one of the most difficult facts of nature. Specifically, this call to restrict behavior is nothing more than “internalized homophobia.” As a 30yr lgbt activist I had a hard time coming to grips with the fact that we ALL possess such feelings, even the most militant of us. It may manifest itself in overt hostility and oppression, or it may be as simple as a gay male being uncomfortable with “butch” lesbians , drag queens or transsexuals or public displays of affection. This learned lesson has been a guiding principle in my life has helped me through several difficult choices over the years.

  4. Jeff LeTourneau
    February 9, 2013 at 2:41 pm

    Sorry for the confusing link. My comments were in response to the recent call by one of the lgbt organizers for Bob Tucker and his lover of 15 yrs to “not Kiss” if they are to be allowed into the parade

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