Tan Nguyen flips and flops in a hope to court the non-racist vote

I guess Tan Nguyen has re-thought the “I hate brown people” approach to campaigning in a district where over 65% of the registered voters are hispanic.

The Loretta Sanchez campaign received a letter from the opponent Nguyen yesterday where he said that his position on the issue of immigration was much softer than Sanchez has framed it—in fact, Nguyen wrote that he does not support the House of Representatives bill 4437.

Some recent polling must have told Nguyen to distance himself from calling the families of the 47th District an uneducated burden on the system.

From the letter:

“It has been reported to me that you have been misstating my stance on illegal immigration, and erroneously stating that I support House Bill H.R. 4437. Part of that bill makes being an illegal alien a felony. I do not support that aspect of the bill…

it is a serious distortion of my program to state that I would condone placing illegal aliens in prison.”

  9 comments for “Tan Nguyen flips and flops in a hope to court the non-racist vote

  1. Anonymous
    August 3, 2006 at 10:24 am

    How is this a flip-flop? I never heard Tan come out and say he supported the House Bill, that was your conclusion. Start using your head and stop with your racist propaganda.

  2. August 3, 2006 at 10:41 am

    Propaganda? Ha!

  3. Santa Ana Sam
    August 3, 2006 at 12:11 pm

    Who used racist propoganda? By the way, Tan told me that he supports the House bill. So there pendejo.

  4. Alice Berkowitz
    August 3, 2006 at 1:08 pm

    Mike,

    You are obviously part of Loretta’s campaign. That must be why you destroy and vandalize Tan’s sign, make unfounded statements about his campaign, and use irrational thinking in calling Tan a racist…need I continue?

    Here is the full context of the letter:

    July 31, 2006

    Hon. Loretta Sanchez
    U.S. Representative
    12397 Lewis Street, Suite 101
    Garden Grove, CA 92840

    Dear Ms. Sanchez,

    It has been reported to me that you have been misstating my stance on illegal immigration, and erroneously stating that I support House Bill H.R.4437. Part of that bill makes being an illegal alien a felony. I do not support that aspect of the bill, and I never have. Furthermore, I strongly oppose any part of the bill which criminalizes the humanitarian effort of religious organizations.

    I do not support anything that would encourage illegal immigration, but it is a serious distortion of my program to state that I would condone placing illegal aliens in prison.

    As there are many issues which we legitimately disagree on, I am sure it is not necessary to misstate each others positions.

    I therefore would expect you to refrain from repeating this incorrect description of my stance.

    Sincerely,

    Tan Nguyen

  5. August 3, 2006 at 1:25 pm

    I’ve have never touched a Tan Nguyen sign.

    And like Tan, I am flip flopping. I can’t call Tan a racist if he’s no longer claiming that immigrants are at the roots of OC’s problems, and if his stance on illegal immigration is so close to that of Loretta Sanchez.

    With this letter, Tan is saying that he would have done exactly what Sanchez did when she rejected the bill in the house. Remind me again why we should vote for Tan.

  6. Cesar Lopez
    August 3, 2006 at 1:36 pm

    The onoly racist here is you…

    The United States treats Vietnamese and non-Latino immigrants entirely different than it treats Latin American immigrants.

    Even though Latin Americans are only 8% of the worlds population, they comprise over 50% of legal/legalized U.S. immigrants. Mexico alone has contributed 32% of recent U.S. immigrants. By comparison Vietnam, which has a population similar to Mexico, sends only 3% of US immigrants.

    The high Latin American immigration percentage is mainly because 80% of illegal aliens in the U.S. are Latin American, and the U.S. does not deport them. Instead they are allowed to stay, especially if they have a U.S. born child (who is generously granted U.S. citizenship), and in many cases they are adjusted to legal status through “legalization”.

    Vietnamese illegal aliens never received this special treatment. From 1975 to 1990, 600,000 Vietnamese Boat People escaped Vietnam and made their way to Asian refugee camps. Most of them had worked for the former U.S. backed South Vietnam government and military, helping the United States to defeat global Communism, thereby helping to give Americans the freedom and prosperity they enjoy today.

    Because the U.S. stopped supporting South Vietnam in the war against Communism, the Communists took over in 1975. South Vietnamese government workers and military officers suffered imprisonment and persecution under the new Communist government, and thus were eligible for political asylum – if they could escape Vietnam. Some of these escaping boat people had spent over 10 years in Communist forced labor camps before they were able to sneak out of Vietnam.

    But 120,000 of these boat people could not prove Political Persecution, and most in fact did leave Vietnam only because of the poor Socialist economy there. They were designated illegal aliens and returned to Vietnam, many by force. This included children that had grown up in the refugee camps. These children grew up learning english, American history, and culture, only to be sent back to Vietnam.

  7. August 7, 2006 at 8:42 am

    just for my own edification, has Tan ever publicly supported the bill? do you know of any newspaper articles or any other supporting evidence?

    if so, i’d say it’s fair to continue to refer to him as a racist regardless of any politically motivated changes of heart.

  8. Anonymous
    August 7, 2006 at 9:35 pm

    Cesar Lopez,

    wow you really know your vietnemese immigration facts don’t you. that name doesn’t sound made up or anything either.

    why don’t you tan lovers explain tan’s position then… if he is against the house bill, then is he for the senate bill? maybe tan should learn that if he is a congressman then he can either vote yes, no, or abstain. so which is it? oh i know.. its whatever way the wind is blowing when he sticks his finger in the air.

  9. Anonymous
    October 19, 2006 at 4:18 pm

    Cesar Lopez,

    Yes the US treats Viet immigrants differently than any other immigrants. Viets are “Special” immigrant. :)

    INS cannot deport any Viets who have commited deportable crimes to Vietnam. Vietnamese gov’t has never signed reprocity/repatriation agreement with US. That’s why a lot of Viets criminal aliens still in US. The INS can only hold them for 90 days and let them back into the community.

    About 95% of Viets came to US for economic reason just like other immigrants from other countries.

    Some of Viets who came to US first hate the new arrivals and sometimes threaten them with physical violence or Lies. If the new arrivals don’t agree with their political point of view.

    Quoc Ai.

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